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Video games positively affect young people’s literacy

by Sercan Tahtalı
young people mobile games

Video games positively affect young people’s literacy, according to research published by the National Literacy Trust.

The report, joint research of the National Literacy Trust, Association of UK Interactive Entertainment, and Penguin Random House Children, covers 4,300 young people aged 11-16 living in the UK.

Some of the data in the research are as follows:

  • 4 in 5 (79.4%) young people who play video games read materials relating to video games once a month, including in-game communications (39.9%), reviews and blogs (30.5%), books (21.8%) and fan fiction (19.4%)
  • 1 in 3 (35.3%) young people who play video games believe playing video games makes them a better reader
  • 3 in 5 (62.5%) young people who play video games write something relating to video games once a month, including video game scripts (27.5%), advice to help other players (22.1%), fan fiction (10.8%) and blogs or reviews (8.0%)

Many of the young people in the research said that games also provided mental support for them.

In a press release discussing the research, Jonathan Douglas, Chief Executive of the National Literacy Trust, said:

“We know that video games are a part of everyday life for so many children, young people, and families across the UK, so it is exciting to uncover the opportunities that video game playing can provide for young people to engage in reading, stimulate creativity through writing, enhance communication with friends and family, and support empathy and wellbeing.

 

“COVID-19 has significantly disrupted young people’s literacy and learning in recent months, and we want to ensure that no stone is left unturned when it comes to identifying new and innovative ways to support children’s literacy when they return to school in September.

 

“Through our partnership with Ukie and Penguin Random House Children’s, we hope to be able to provide families and schools with the resources and tools they need to best harness the benefits of video games for young people’s literacy.”

You can find all the details of the research and other resources on the website of the National Literary Trust.

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